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NEVER leave your dog in a hot car!

Every year, dogs suffer and die when their guardians make the mistake of leaving them in a parked car, even for “just a minute” while they run an errand.

Parked cars are death-traps for dogs: On a 78-degree day, the temperature inside a parked car can soar to between 100 and 120 degrees in just minutes, and on a 90-degree day, the interior temperature can reach as high as 160 degrees in less than 10 minutes.

Animals can sustain brain damage or even die from heatstroke in just 15 minutes. Beating the heat is extra tough for dogs because they can only cool themselves by panting and by sweating through their paw pads.

If you see a dog left alone in a hot car, take down the car’s colour, model, make, and license plate number. Have the owner paged in the nearest buildings, or call local humane authorities or police. Have someone keep an eye on the dog.

Don’t leave the scene until the situation has been resolved.

If the authorities are unresponsive or too slow and the dog’s life appears to be in imminent danger, find a witness (or several) who will back up your assessment, take steps to remove the suffering animal from the car, and then wait for authorities to arrive.

Watch for heatstroke symptoms such as restlessness, excessive thirst, thick saliva, heavy panting, lethargy, lack of appetite, dark tongue, rapid heartbeat, fever, vomiting, bloody diarrhoea, and lack of coordination. If a dog shows any of these symptoms, get him or her out of the heat, preferably into an air-conditioned vehicle, and then to a veterinarian immediately. If you are unable to transport the dog yourself, take him or her into an airconditioned building if possible and call animal control: Tell them it is an emergency.

Provide water to drink, and if possible spray the dog with a garden hose or immerse him or her in a tub of cool (but not iced) water for up to two minutes in order to lower the body temperature gradually. You can also place the dog in front of an electric fan. Applying cool, wet towels to the groin area, stomach, chest, and paws can also help. Be careful not to use ice or cold water, and don’t overcool the animal.

When walking your dog, keep in mind that if it feels hot enough to fry an egg outside, it probably is. When the air temperature is
86 degrees, the asphalt can reach a sizzling 135 degrees – more than hot enough to cook an egg in five minutes. And it can do the same to our canine companions’ sensitive foot pads.

On an 87-degree day, asphalt temperatures can reach 140 degrees, hot enough to cause burns, permanent damage and scarring after just one minute of contact. Rapid burns and blistering can occur at 150 degrees. Hot sidewalks, pavement and parking lots can not only burn paws, they also reflect heat onto dogs’ bodies , increasing their risk of deadly heatstroke.

If you wouldn’t put your dog in a frying pan, please don’t make him or her walk on a hot pavement. Always test the pavement
with your hand before setting out (too hot to touch is too hot for your dog), walk early in the morning or late at night when it’s cooler, carry water and take frequent breaks in shady spots and never make dogs wear muzzles that restrict their breathing.

Summer tips for your dog

Exercise your dog early in the morning or late at night.

Since these are the cooler parts of the day, this will make the walk more comfortable for both you and your dog. I’m a believer in vigorous exercise for healthy dogs, but this is the time of year to back off on exercise intensity.

Use doggie boots.

You can find these at your local pet supply store. If you can’t walk your dog during the early and later hours of the day, this is a good way of protecting him. Heat rises from the ground, especially on surfaces like cement and asphalt, and dogs absorb and release heat through their feet. Just like boots prevent the dog from absorbing the cold in the winter, they also isolate heat.

Keep your dog hydrated!

Different dogs have different needs when battling the heat. Keep in mind that darker coats absorb more heat than lighter coats. Also, overweight dogs are at higher risk for dehydration. Carry a bottle of water when going on a walk with your dog. Better yet have your dog carry it for you in a backpack or a vest! The water in the bottles will keep the dog cooler and also give the dog a sense of purpose.

Keep your dog in the shade

Don’t have air conditioning? No problem! Find a spot in the shade and set up a kiddie pool. Lay down a wet towel for your dog to lie on. Or simply set up a fan in front of a pan of ice.


Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships

From 27th June to 10th July 2022
Wimbledon, West London

Experience two weeks of first-class tennis, served with strawberries and cream, at the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships.

The world of tennis descends on Wimbledon in south-west London every summer for the longest-running tennis tournament in the world, and one of four annual Grand Slam tennis events held around the globe.

Games are still played on the original playing surface, grass, and there’s a strict white-only dress code for players.

The tournament attracts around 500,000 spectators including the royal family and millions of TV viewers worldwide.

2022 is a historical year for Wimbledon. Not only does it mark 100 years of Centre Court, but also the permanent introduction of play on the Middle Sunday for the first time. 2022 also welcomes the first year of the 14&U Junior Championships.

Wimbledon tickets: in advance

There was no public ballot for tickets in 2022. Guests who were successful in the 2020 public ballot have been offered the same day and court for 2022. Fans can register for ballot returns. Hundreds of tickets are also released daily throughout the tournament.

Wimbledon tickets: on the day

Almost uniquely for a major sporting event, Wimbledon offers spectators the chance to buy premium tickets on the day – but
be prepared to queue!

History of Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships

The Lawn Tennis Championships at Wimbledon have developed from the first meeting in 1877, witnessed by a few spectators, to a highly professional tournament attracting an attendance of close to 500,000 people. Players from more than 60 nations compete in front of a crowd of millions worldwide, through press, radio, internet and television.

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